A Brief Introduction about the Early Event of the Ukrainian Crisis

A Brief Introduction about the Early Event of the Ukrainian Crisis

Although the situation has fizzled down over the past three years, I wanted to write on the topic of the earlier events of the Ukrainian Crisis. So, to vaguely summarize what’s going on in Ukraine, there’s a civil divide between the east and west side of the country, with the eastern side of the country wanting to increase their ties with Russia and the western side wanting to become closer to the European Union. Ukraine is one of the few countries in Europe that has yet to become a part of the EU or NATO. With that being said, in 2013, the president of Ukraine, Viktor Yanukovych, abandoned an expected EU association agreement which caused an uproar for the western side of the country. In 2010, Yanukovych, from the eastern side of Ukraine (pro-Russian) won the presidency against the pro-European candidate, Yulia Tymoshenko. As you can see in the map I’ve attached, the votes are obviously geographically divided.

A little after the EU agreement was abandoned, Yanukovych accepted a $15 billion deal from Russia that cut prices of gas and was proposed to tranquilize protesters. Of course, this was viewed as an accepted sellout deal, leading to the protests in the capital, Kiev, located in western Ukraine. Protest went on for months. In January of 2014, a set of draconian laws was installed that hindered freedom of speech, slandering of government officials, internet usage, news media, and other demonstration behavior. One of the more interesting ways that the Ukrainian people “loopholed” one of the draconian laws that prohibited the wearing of helmets during protests, was by wearing saucepans and other kitchen utensils on their heads. By the end of February 2014, Yanukovych fled Ukraine and there was a total of around 130 deaths from protests, with 25 deaths and 241 injuries all from the nation’s “bloodiest day”. The government was temporarily replaced with a nationalist government. In March 2014, Crimea, located in eastern Ukraine and occupied by around 60% Russian speakers, was integrated by pro-Russian activists and Russian military, leading to a referendum that resulted in the annexation of the peninsula. Crimea is now recognized as part of the Russian federation, with

By the end of February 2014, Yanukovych fled Ukraine and there was a total of around 130 deaths from protests, with 25 deaths and 241 injuries all from the nation’s “bloodiest day”. The government was temporarily replaced with a nationalist government. In March 2014, Crimea, located in eastern Ukraine and occupied by around 60% Russian speakers, was integrated by pro-Russian activists and Russian military, leading to a referendum that resulted in the annexation of the peninsula. Crimea is now recognized as part of the Russian federation, with support of over 95% of its occupants.


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